3 Keys to Transform Your Relationships

3 Keys to Transform Your Relationships

  1. Be the Best Version of Yourself: Be Authentic – that is being open, honest, straightforward, respectful to others, and accountable for the impact you have on others.
  2. Be Transparent – let your joy and confidence show. Listen attentively to others without a need to “top” their experiences or discount their beliefs. Life should not be a game of one-upmanship.
  3. Master behavioral agility – understand and appreciate the behavioral differences of others.

Oscar Wilde once said, “Be yourself, everyone else is already taken.”

Inspirational Quotes for an Empowered 2019!

Inspirational Quotes for an Amazing 2019

Happy New Year!

As we step into the New Year, we offer you our favorite quotes of inspiration. This month, find your own favorite quote that aligns with your authentic brand and values. It may boost your confidence, your passions, your engagement with others, and be a new call to action. We encourage you to periodically revisit your inspirational quote. Here are ours:


“Don’t ask what the world needs. Ask what makes you come alive, and go do it. Because what the world needs is people who have come alive.”
― Howard Thurman

 

Clyde Lowstuter
President & CEO, Robertson Lowstuter, Inc.
Connect with Clyde on LinkedIn


Carolyn Lowstuter Robertson Lowstuter Executive Coach

“I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, they will forget what you did, but they will never forget how you made them feel.”
― Maya Angelou

 

Carolyn Lowstuter
Executive Vice President, Robertson Lowstuter, Inc.
Connect with Carolyn on LinkedIn


When was the last time you said to yourself, “I’m not perfect… But I’m enough.”
― Carl R. Rogers

 

Ron Hirasawa
Vice President, Robertson Lowstuter, Inc.
Connect with Ron on LinkedIn


“Almost everything will work again if you unplug it for a few minutes, including you.”
― Anne Lamott

 

Kathryn Hartrick
VP & General Counsel, Robertson Lowstuter, Inc.
Connect with Kathryn on LinkedIn


“It had long since come to my attention that people of accomplishment rarely sat back and let things happen to them. They went out and happened to things.”
― Leonardo da Vinci

 

Dave Dallam
Vice President, Robertson Lowstuter, Inc.
Connect with Dave on LinkedIn


“It always seems impossible until it’s done.”
― Nelson Mandela

 

Susan Snowden
Vice President, Robertson Lowstuter, Inc.
Connect with Susan on LinkedIn


“Perpetual optimism is a force multiplier.”
― Colin Powell

 

Matt Gonring
Vice President, Robertson Lowstuter, Inc.
Connect with Matt on LinkedIn


“Consult not your fears but your hopes and your dreams. Think not about your frustrations, but about your unfulfilled potential. Concern yourself not with what you tried and failed in, but with what it is still possible for you to do.”
― Pope John XXIII

 

Pat Mater
Vice President, Robertson Lowstuter, Inc.
Connect with Pat on LinkedIn


“I learned that courage was not the absence of fear, but the triumph over it. The brave man is not he who does not feel afraid, but he who conquers that fear.”
― Nelson Mandela

 

David Filkin
Vice President, Robertson Lowstuter, Inc.
Connect with David on LinkedIn


“An organization’s ability to learn, and translate that learning into action rapidly, is the ultimate competitive advantage.”
― Jack Welch

 

Anil Shah
Vice President, Robertson Lowstuter, Inc.
Connect with Anil on LinkedIn


“The three great essentials to achieve anything worth while are: Hard work, Stick-to-itiveness, and Common sense.”
― Thomas A. Edison

 

Laurie Powles
EA/Office Manager, Robertson Lowstuter, Inc.


“Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things that you didn’t do than by the ones you did do. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.”
― Mark Twain

 

Sharon Noha
Senior Vice President, Robertson Lowstuter, Inc.
Connect with Sharon on LinkedIn


“I don’t believe you have to do better than everybody else. I believe you have to do better than you ever thought you could be.”
― Ken Venturi

 

Paul Duski
Senior Vice President, Robertson Lowstuter, Inc.
Connect with Paul on LinkedIn


“Learn from the mistakes of others. You can’t live long enough to make them all yourself.”
― Eleanor Roosevelt

 

Bert Allen
Vice President, Robertson Lowstuter, Inc.
Connect with Bert on LinkedIn


“Aim for the moon. If you miss, you may hit a star.”
― W. Clement Stone

 

Rick Canada
Vice President, Robertson Lowstuter, Inc.
Connect with Rick on LinkedIn


“Finish each day and be done with it. You have done what you could. Some blunders and absurdities no doubt crept in; forget them as soon as you can. Tomorrow is a new day; begin it well and serenely and with too high a spirit to be encumbered with your old nonsense.”
― Ralph Waldo Emerson

 

Christy Glick
Director of Communications and Projects, Robertson Lowstuter, Inc.
Connect with Christy on LinkedIn


“Setting goals is the first step in turning the invisible into the visible.”
― Tony Robbins

 

Stefany Alvear
EA Client Services & Marketing Manager, Robertson Lowstuter, Inc.
Connect with Stefany on LinkedIn


Kenna Washington Robertson Lowstuter

“We keep moving forward, opening new doors, and doing new things, because we’re curious and curiosity keeps leading us down new paths.”
― Walt Disney

 

Kenna Washington
Vice President of Finance and IT, Robertson Lowstuter, Inc.


Best wishes for an empowered New Year in 2019 and may you always…
“Create Uncommon Results”®

Sincerely,

The R|L Team

Coaching Tips for Your Holiday Parties

Happy Holidays!

As the year ends, we think about all we are grateful for. We extend our best wishes and genuine gratitude to those who have contributed to our firm’s 37 years of success. We have been truly blessed with so many opportunities to interact with and serve talented people across all disciplines of our executive development consultancy.

During this joyous time, you might be attending different events with family, friends, and colleagues. Our executive and career coaches want to provide you with some helpful tips on how to enhance these events as you continue to expand and strengthen your network.

Here is what to do (and not do) at the next holiday party:


“Be Other-Focused rather than Self-Focused at your next holiday gathering. Rather than seeking to tell all about your notable successes, be insatiably curious about others. You might ask about significant learning or results they achieved. Ask penetrating questions that demonstrate that you are deeply interested in them. Also, be enthused for their successes.”

Clyde Lowstuter
President & CEO, Robertson Lowstuter, Inc.
Connect with Clyde on LinkedIn


“Be inclusive and widen your circle of conversation… Introduce others who are standing nearby to your friends and colleagues. That will naturally expand the topics of conversation.”

Carolyn Lowstuter
Executive Vice President, Robertson Lowstuter, Inc.
Connect with Carolyn on LinkedIn


“Help others without expectations of reciprocity – you will be pleasantly surprised. Share useful information and insights (e.g., articles, videos, TED talk links, seminars, best practices, heroes of the day, etc.). Interact with those it can help/inspire. If you can, maintain notes of when you talked and what it was about.”

Ron Hirasawa
Vice President, Robertson Lowstuter, Inc.
Connect with Ron on LinkedIn


“You might (mistakenly) view a holiday party as a great opportunity to tell your story and MARKET yourself to many people. Pause, take a breath, and re-evaluate. Yes, the party is an opportunity to meet key people, but the marketing/relationship building really starts after the party. Here are 3 suggestions for how you ‘follow up’ after the party:

  1. Connect on LinkedIn within 48 hours after the party;
  2. Call and set up a time to meet for a brief coffee or a meal;
  3. Thank someone who provided you with an introduction and provide an update on your next steps.

Good luck!

Kathryn Hartrick
VP & General Counsel, Robertson Lowstuter, Inc.
Connect with Kathryn on LinkedIn


“The holiday season is a time when we are all reminded of the importance of our relationships. It is a time for family and friends, and a time when we are most congenial with business colleagues and associates. So importantly, this is a good time to remind ourselves that it is our relationships – all year long – that sustain us and facilitate our ability to be effective. Even a team is just a collection of one-on-one relationships!”

Dave Dallam
Vice President, Robertson Lowstuter, Inc.
Connect with Dave on LinkedIn


“After being acquainted ask, ‘How can I help you?’ By offering help, you have established generosity, openness, and authenticity as the meeting protocol. While, of course, there is no guarantee of reciprocity, you have set the tone and increased the chances for a mutually beneficial exchange.”

Susan Snowden
Vice President, Robertson Lowstuter, Inc.
Connect with Susan on LinkedIn


“Never go to a party (or meeting) without knowing all you can learn about the person you are meeting. Make reference to a compatibility or an interesting fact about them and integrate it into the conversation.”

Matt Gonring
Vice President, Robertson Lowstuter, Inc.
Connect with Matt on LinkedIn


“When meeting someone for the first time, enter their information into your email contacts. In the Notes section, write any information you gleaned from your conversation – family, interests, pets, school, etc. Next time you talk, you’ll be able to review your ‘Cliff Notes’ and be able to pick up where you left off. Keep adding information as your relationship grows. If you are afraid of forgetting, use the Notes app on your phone and dictate a quick reminder to yourself.”

Pat Mater
Vice President, Robertson Lowstuter, Inc.
Connect with Pat on LinkedIn


“Spend no more than 7 minutes with any one person. With each new interaction, the mindset is to make a new friend.”

David Filkin
Vice President, Robertson Lowstuter, Inc.
Connect with David on LinkedIn


“Holiday time is to remember how blessed we are and think of others in need of help and support. In your holiday gathering, search out individuals who you think can use a kind ear and start a conversation on how they are and how you can help.”

Anil Shah
Vice President, Robertson Lowstuter, Inc.
Connect with Anil on LinkedIn


“Introduce yourself with a positive attitude. Everyone you meet could be a potential acquaintance. Your conversation should be focused on the person you’re speaking with – show genuine interest in their lives, interests, and careers. Trust will develop from there. Good luck and most of all – have fun!”

Laurie Powles
EA/Office Manager, Robertson Lowstuter, Inc.


“Make yourself memorable! Be thoughtful ahead of the event about a few stimulating and exciting topics that will be appropriate for a social evening. Perhaps you’ve just seen a new Broadway show, traveled to an interesting country, volunteered at a non-profit you’re passionate about, or read a wonderful book. When you follow up to arrange for a ‘real’ networking meeting subsequent to the party, the individuals you met will be eager to connect with you.”

Sharon Noha
Senior Vice President, Robertson Lowstuter, Inc.
Connect with Sharon on LinkedIn


  • “Remember everyone you meet is a potential friend or colleague. Always be prepared; how are you perceived? Don’t be the ‘party animal’ – first impressions LAST.
  • When meeting many people during the evening, get to know them. If they are in your same profession, or a consultant in your space, follow up later to schedule a meeting.
  • Be comfortable with your brand statement. You will probably be asked: ‘What do you do?’ or ‘Tell me about yourself.’”

Paul Duski
Senior Vice President, Robertson Lowstuter, Inc.
Connect with Paul on LinkedIn


“Now that we are in the holiday season, set an objective to establish at least one new relationship from every holiday party you attend.”

Bert Allen
Vice President, Robertson Lowstuter, Inc.
Connect with Bert on LinkedIn


“Regardless of who you’re talking to, the setting, or its purpose, be intentional about remaining open to what you’re hearing and the associated learning. Bottom line, be willing to be influenced by others’ perspectives.”

Rick Canada
Vice President, Robertson Lowstuter, Inc.
Connect with Rick on LinkedIn


“Enjoy the moment – stop and take a second to look around; appreciate the people you already know or will meet, and the chance to celebrate together.”

Christy Glick
Director of Communications and Projects, Robertson Lowstuter, Inc.
Connect with Christy on LinkedIn


“Have an open-minded, value-add attitude during your conversations. Be warm and inviting to learn about others’ favorite restaurants or jazz clubs. Expand on people’s ideas using a ‘Yes, AND’ approach. The tone of the conversations will inevitably be engaging and authentic.”

Stefany Alvear
EA Client Services & Marketing Manager, Robertson Lowstuter, Inc.
Connect with Stefany on LinkedIn


We wish you happy holidays and much success in the New Year! May you always…
“Create Uncommon Results”®

Sincerely,

Clyde and Carolyn and the R|L Team

5 Top Accelerants to Your Effective Search

By Clyde Lowstuter

Wind-up CarPower and patience are the yin/yang of the job search. You need power to feel confident in your skills and patience to help you step back – so you can deeply reflect and choose the right next step. The future might seem uncertain, but ultimately you are in charge. You determine your thoughts, feelings, and behavior. Only you control how you present yourself, what you say, and where you focus. If you tell yourself, “It’s a tough job market out there,” you will find it exceedingly difficult to network and land the perfect job. If every day, you remind yourself of the value you have contributed to an organization, you will be more confident and self-assured, while seeing a multitude of possibilities in the market. It is easy to get derailed and frustrated during your search. Take heart, we have all been there. Here are some strategies to help you regain your footing.

1. Manage Your Emotional Roller Coaster:

It’s not the lack of technical competency that will derail your search; it’s those strong negative emotions that dominate your thoughts and rob you of a positive, motivating frame of mind. Focus on what you are thankful for. Let your gratitude influence your attitude. See R|L Blog Article: Gratefulness Buoys and Motivates

2. Strive for Networking Mastery:

Networking is a process that is both an art and a science. It’s interwoven with heighten common sense and driven by courageous resourcefulness. Bottom line: if you are not receiving at least 2 additional names from each of your networking sources, something is amiss. If you find that your contacts are hesitant to open up their contact list, your approach might be experienced as presumptuous or overly demanding. Alternatively – you might not be positive or confident enough to generate interest or enthusiasm for your search. R|L Blog Article: I’ve Heard There’s a Recession: I’ve Decided not to Participate

3. Entitlement Mentality:

If you find yourself outraged that you were terminated, welcome to the world of entitlement. When I got zapped a number of years ago, I was the poster boy for a victim operating with a high level of entitlement. “It’s not fair!” was my sole mantra. Until I had my epiphany in which I realized that it was absolutely proper for my boss to terminate me, I was zigging and zagging in our relationship. Once I took complete responsibility for how my life and career looked, only then did my search efforts take off. I invite you to look deeply into your life and identify those dimensions in which you feel that you entitled to a “Get Out of Trouble” pass.  See R|L Blog Article: Martyr No More

4. Interviewing Savviness

There are myriad nuances to interviewing. If you are not prepared – You. Will. Fail.
Minimally, you should know the details of your credentials backwards and forwards. You also absolutely need to confidently and positively articulate why you left, the results you achieved, and how you can contribute to this other organization. Put yourself in the interviewer’s’ shoes – ask yourself the questions, he/she would ask.

Do your research on the company, its competitor, and major trends that might influence the company you are interviewing. Do ask open-ended questions that demonstrate your interest and the depth of your business acumen. Don’t talk more than 40%; the impression you make by waxing ad nauseum is never positive. See R|L Blog Article: Interview Impression.

5. References and Reason for Leaving:

References are worth more than your weight in gold. They provide a glimpse of who you are, what you can do, and your core values. Faint praise from a reference is damaging praise because it raises red flags that might knock you out of consideration. If you feel that your relationship with your former boss is rocky, fix it. Take a minute to get your head on straight and, if possible, pay him/her a visit. Take complete ownership for your exit. Express your gratitude for the opportunity to work there. Be specific about the things you learned and the skills you gained. Elaborate a bit on your vision for the future and your career trajectory. Share your goals in a confident and enthusiastic manner. Get them excited about your future endeavors. Then, discuss the references process. It is critical that you and your boss be aligned with a reasonable explanation of your exit. Anticipate, prepare, and practice discussing this in a positive manner with zero defensiveness and a rational explanation. Chapter 10 – Your References are Like Gold – Worksheets 33-37

Don’t rush; take some time to think about what you want and where you want to go in the next five years, ten years, fifteen years. Passion is contagious. If you can envision your future you will become enthused. Layer this enthusiasm with the ROI of your past successes and you will have the ideal presence for your search.

You’ve got this.

“Be the change you want to see in the world.” Gandhi.

Let’s Get Hyper!

By Clyde Lowstuter

If you’ve followed our approach to resume writing, you know that we repeatedly ask my favorite, yet most obnoxious question, “So, What?” While, perhaps, unsettling at first, it’s a proven process by which you can quantify your accomplishments and highlight your unique background. Additionally, we recommend that our career transition clients insert ResumeLinks™ that highlight significant accomplishments or events that showcase their talent, skills, and abilities.

ResumeLinks™ – whether they are text or video will:

  • Direct the reader to a few substantive “events” or statements in news headlines, press releases, websites, or video presentations, illustrating your specific impact.
  • ResumeLinks™ should be used exclusively to demonstrate your performance, not link to your companies or universities. The reason being, you don’t want to divert readers away from your resume content or brand persona.
  • Cut through the clutter of competing resumes by grabbing the attention of resume screeners.
  • Buoy your boldness and confidence, while reigniting your passion for your role.
  • Enhance your visibility in the marketplace.

Businessman giving presentation to his ColleaguesExamples:  One client created ResumeLinks™ to highlight her significant leadership capabilities in the highly profitable sale of her company which netted $1.2 billion.  Another executive linked his role to a press release quantifying his successful growth strategy.  A litigator linked a video clip of his compelling closing statements from a highly publicized trial. A high-tech executive linked his new product launch campaign to a social media advertising video.

ResumeLinks™ provide interest, intrigue, and ensure the integrity of your credentials. They are limited only to your imagination. However, finesse is key. You only need 2-3 carefully placed links to anchor your resume. Get greedy and over-indulge – you risk being seen as trying too hard to impress others, or worse, people may think you are insecure.

Start with your quantified resume. Answer the tough, “So, What?” questions. Look over your list of impactful accomplishments. Are you portraying yourself as powerfully as you’d like? What do you want to showcase to a potential employer? What roles do you want to particularly highlight? Be mindful when selecting your links; if you have worked for a privately held company, make sure that you find quantifications that are public knowledge and can be shared.

Identify your successes.  Deepen your credibility through ResumeLinks™.  Solidify your reputation.

Let’s get Hyper!!